Public, media invited to attend virtual meeting of Criminal Justice Coordinating Council

The next meeting of the Missoula County Criminal Justice Coordinating Council will take place from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Friday, June 26, via Microsoft Teams. Members of the public and media are invited to attend the meeting, which will feature discussion on efforts to reform the criminal justice system locally.

Agenda items include discussing proposals for future criminal justice reforms in Missoula County, such as increased funding for crisis intervention, implicit bias, LGBTQ+ and trauma-informed trainings, as well as a jail diversion initiative specific to Native American populations, who are disproportionately represented in the Missoula County Detention Facility. Currently, 17 % of MCDF inmates identify as Native American, compared with 4 % of county residents who identify as Native American.

District Court Judge Leslie Halligan, who serves as the current chair of the CJCC, will lead the meeting. There will be opportunity for public comment and questions from the news media at the end.

The media and public can join the meeting via Teams using the information below:

Join Microsoft Teams Meeting
+1 406-272-4824
Conference ID: 596 772 250#

MCAT also plans to stream the meeting live on its website and Facebook page

The CJCC is a multi-agency collaboration that uses a data-driven approach to reforming the local criminal justice system, which includes reducing the jail population, addressing ethnic and racial disparities, and more effectively responding to mental health issues. It was established and is primarily funded through a grant from the MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge, a nationwide effort to reduce over-incarceration by changing the way America thinks about and uses jails. Three county staff members in the CJCC Department directly support the council’s work.

“In light of renewed calls for criminal justice reform from the national to local levels, we want to make sure the public knows what the CJCC in Missoula County is doing and how they can get involved,” said Kristen Jordan, CJCC manager. “Our team is doing great work, though we know there’s still much to do to ensure an equitable justice system for all in Missoula County.”

Current CJCC initiatives include:

  • Applying for a $125,000 grant through the state Department of Health and Human Services to fund a mobile crisis team that would respond to a call for someone in mental health crisis instead of law enforcement or other first responders. This team would include two mental health professionals to assess and assist the person in crisis and a peer-support specialist and/or case manager to ensure the person receives follow-up treatment and mental health services. Using a mobile crisis team would reduce jail bookings and emergency room visits, decrease arrests and prosecutions, and allow for more appropriate use of law enforcement and first responder time. If awarded, the county and City of Missoula will provide matching funding, which, coupled with grant funds received earlier this year, would total $380,000 to get a mobile crisis team up and running. Research shows that every dollar spent on mobile crisis saves $5 to $7 elsewhere in the criminal justice system.
  • An effort to analyze the result of releasing pre-trial inmates accused of low-level, nonviolent crimes from Missoula County Detention Facility amid COVID-19 concerns. MCDF reduced their population by approximately 50% by releasing inmates who met these criteria in March and have not rebooked the majority of them as they await trial. CJCC staff are collecting data to determine the rate at which they were re-arrested and/or missed court dates. While releasing inmates accused of low-level, nonviolent crimes was already taking place at a slower, more methodical pace before the pandemic, the data gathered from releasing a large number of inmates at once will prove invaluable to the CJCC as it develops and implements more programs to address the root causes of crime, including poverty, addiction and mental health issues.  

  • Implementation of Calibrate, a prosecution-led pre-trial diversion program housed in the County Attorney’s Office. This voluntary program offers some criminal defendants an opportunity to have their criminal charges dismissed if they successfully complete a treatment plan specific to their needs. Treatment plans may include financial counseling, inpatient treatment for addictions and restitution. 

  • Increased use of the Public Safety Assessment, a risk assessment tool that uses nine factors to predict whether an individual will commit a new crime or fail to return to a scheduled court hearing if released before trial.  

  • Development of the Jail Data Dashboard, which is available online. It depicts several key data points that are essential in understanding the jail population and helps to identify, analyze, solve and manage systems issues in the criminal justice process, such as reducing racial and ethnic disparities in the justice system.

To learn more about the CJCC, view the Jail Data Dashboard, and review meeting minutes and agendas, head to missoula.co/cjcc.