Agencies to Host Community Forum on Possible Extension of Temporary Safe Outdoor Space 

The local agencies and organizations that have partnered to stand up Missoula’s Temporary Safe Outdoor Space will hold a community forum to share how the project is going and discuss the possibility of extending it beyond the current public health emergency.   

The virtual forum will take place from 12 to 1 p.m. Tuesday, April 27, via Microsoft Teams. Members of the public and news media can join the session using the following information: 

Microsoft Teams meeting
Join on your computer or mobile app
Click here to join the meeting 
Or call in (audio only)
 +1 406-272-4824 
Phone Conference ID: 900 656 388# 

The TSOS is a safe, healthy, secure area on private land, staffed 24/7, that currently supports around two dozen unsheltered people during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is operated by Hope Rescue Mission with logistical support from United Way of Missoula County and Missoula County government.   

Initially set up in response to the public health emergency, the TSOS has successfully supported 53 total residents, connecting them to regular case management and other critical services. Since the space opened in mid-December, the TSOS has transitioned seven people into housing, and four have received housing approval and are waiting to move or are close to securing emergency housing through the YWCA. Six individuals have obtained or are close to obtaining IDs, which greatly increases the chance of securing permanent housing and employment. In addition, four individuals have become employed since moving to the TSOS, and one has been accepted as a student at the University of Montana. There has been only one law-enforcement call to the site, which was resolved quickly, and only a few medical emergencies requiring first responders.  

Because of this success, organizers are exploring the possibility of continuing the TSOS at its current location as a viable, longer-term transitional housing option for people experiencing homelessness. Organizers have started reaching out to area businesses and homeowners about possibly extending the current site, and they encourage members of the public to attend the community forum to learn more and ask questions. If organizers decide to pursue an extension, it would follow the standard regulatory process required of any other non-emergency project. 

The listening session will feature Susan Hay Patrick, CEO of United Way of Missoula County; Eric Legvold, director of impact at United Way; Jim Hicks, executive director of Hope Rescue Mission; and April Seat, the Mission’s director of outreach. County officials, including the three commissioners, will also attend the forum and answer questions as needed.  

Reimbursement through federal CARES Act funding, emergency support grants from the Human Resource Council and private donations have funded the cost to set up and operate the TSOS so far. Missoula County is currently researching opportunities to fund continued TSOS operations with funding through the American Rescue Plan Act, which has approximately $5 billion designated to address homelessness across the country. Both United Way and Hope Rescue Mission continue to seek and secure private donations to support the site’s operation. 

Agencies to Host Listening Session on Temporary Safe Outdoor Space

The local agencies and organizations that have partnered to stand up Missoula’s Temporary Safe Outdoor Space will hold a listening session this week to share how the project is going and to answer questions and address any concerns from community members.

The virtual forum will take place from noon to 1 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 4, via Microsoft Teams. Members of the public and news media can join the session using the following information:

Microsoft Teams meeting
Click here to join the meeting on your computer or mobile app
Or call in (audio only) +1 406-272-4824
Phone Conference ID: 940 454 833#

The listening session will feature Susan Hay Patrick, CEO of United Way of Missoula County; Eric Legvold, director of impact at United Way; Jim Hicks, executive director of Hope Rescue Mission; and April Seat, the Mission’s director of outreach. County officials, including the three commissioners, will also attend the forum and answer questions as needed.

The TSOS is a safe, healthy, secure area on private land, staffed 24/7, that is currently supporting 24 unsheltered people during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is being offered during the public health emergency because no local providers of food, shelter or services are able to operate at full capacity. It is a project of United Way and Hope Rescue Mission with logistical support through Missoula County.

Since the space opened in mid-December on private land just south of Missoula, staff have already helped TSOS residents connect to regular case management services; acquire identification documents, such as photo IDs and birth certificates, that are often needed to secure housing and employment; and obtain employment, housing or housing vouchers. Officials will provide more details on TSOS operations during the listening session.

The costs to set up the temporary space are being reimbursed through federal CARES Act money, so no local taxpayer dollars are involved. United Way and Hope Rescue Mission continue to seek additional funding to sustain the site through the end of the county’s emergency declaration adopted last March in response to the pandemic. An FAQ about the project can be found online at missoula.co/tsos.

Public Q & A on Temporary Safe Outdoor Space set for Dec. 16

The Temporary Safe Outdoor Space is located on a parcel of privately owned land north of Highway 93 between Buckhouse Bridge and Blue Mountain Road. The private property is leased to Hope Rescue Mission for $1. 

The Missoula City-County Joint Information Center for COVID-19 will hold a public question-and-answer session on the Temporary Safe Outdoor Space, a project of United Way of Missoula County and Hope Rescue Mission, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, from noon to 1 p.m. via Zoom.

The forum will feature a brief overview of the project and then will be open for the general public and news reporters to ask questions.

Missoula’s Temporary Safe Outdoor Space is a safe, healthy, secure area on private land, staffed 24/7, that will house 40 unsheltered people during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is being offered during our public health emergency because no local providers of food, shelter or services are able to operate at full capacity. A large number of people are living outdoors in unsafe situations without sanitary facilities.

The Q & A will feature Susan Hay Patrick, CEO of United Way of Missoula County; Eric Legvold, director of impact at United Way; Jim Hicks, executive director of Hope Rescue Mission; and April Seat, the Mission’s Director of Outreach. Others on hand to answer questions will be Adriane Beck, director of the Office of Emergency Management; Chet Crowser, Chief Planning Officer for Missoula County; and Anne Hughes, Missoula County Chief Operating Officer.

The costs to set up the temporary space are being reimbursed through federal CARES Act money, so no local taxpayer dollars are involved. United Way and Hope Rescue Mission are seeking additional funding to sustain the site through the winter. United Way and Mission leaders held a press conference about the plans on Nov. 20, but misinformation persists in the community. The Joint Information Center is sponsoring this forum to foster clear public information.

The Missoula City-County Joint Information Center for COVID-19 (JIC) is responsible for COVID-19-related public information that is not specifically illness-related. It is part of the response to the pandemic led by the Office of Emergency Management, which serves all of Missoula County. The communications staff of the City and County, Allison Franz at Missoula County and Ginny Merriam at the City, lead the unit.

For more information about the Temporary Safe Outdoor Space, visit the online FAQ.

Please click the link below to join the Zoom webinar:

https://ci-missoula-mt.zoom.us/j/84045466167?pwd=YWtsRHBoRCsrT1lXQyt0ZTZ3Z1FHQT09
Passcode: 117479

Or iPhone one-tap : US: +12532158782,,84045466167# or +12133388477,,84045466167#

Or Telephone: Dial (for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):
US: +1 253 215 8782 or +1 213 338 8477 or +1 267 831 0333

Webinar ID: 840 4546 6167
International numbers available: https://ci-missoula-mt.zoom.us/u/kcTD9olSUz

For more information about the Temporary Safe Outdoor Space, visit this Q & A online: https://www.missoulacounty.us/government/administration/commissioners-office/temporary-safe-outdoor-spaceHere are the Zoom instructions for the meeting:You are invited to a Zoom webinar.When: Dec 16, 2020 12:00 PM Mountain Time (US and Canada)Topic: Public Q & A on Temporary Safe Outdoor SpacePlease click the link below to join the webinar:https://ci-missoula-mt.zoom.us/j/84045466167?pwd=YWtsRHBoRCsrT1lXQyt0ZTZ3Z1FHQT09Passcode: 117479 Or iPhone one-tap : US: +12532158782,,84045466167# or +12133388477,,84045466167# Or Telephone: Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): US: +1 253 215 8782 or +1 213 338 8477 or +1 267 831 0333 Webinar ID: 840 4546 6167 International numbers available: https://ci-missoula-mt.zoom.us/u/kcTD9olSUz

$600,000 Grant Will Boost Mental Health Services in Missoula County Criminal Justice System

Jail
Commissioners Josh Slotnick and Juanita Vero listen to Missoula County Detention Facility Assistant Commander Sheryl Ziegler during a tour of the jail in January. Missoula County recently received a $600,000 grant to incorporate more mental health services into the local criminal justice system, including in the jail.

Missoula County will continue to integrate more mental health services into the local criminal justice system over the next year and a half thanks to a nearly $600,000 grant from the state Department of Health and Human Services Addictive and Mental Disorders Division.

The $584,652 in funding through the department’s County and Tribal Matching Grant program will pay for staff and programming to address mental health and substance abuse issues that often coincide with criminal behavior. It will allow the county to continue providing crucial crisis stabilization services at the Missoula County Detention Facility, which include a jail therapist; a care coordinator who provides case management and peer support, both during incarceration and for up to three months after release; and Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) for law enforcement.

The grant will also provide additional funding to support new resources, including:

  • A CIT coordinator to lead training efforts, which includes organizing Missoula’s annual CIT Academy that provides training to law enforcement and other first responders on how to best help individuals in crisis. Around 40 representatives from local law enforcement agencies and other criminal justice sectors have received this training annually since 2016.
  • A mental health coordinator at Partnership Health Center to facilitate communication among mental health providers, law enforcement and anyone seeking information on local services.
  • A full-time referral and outreach coordinator at Western Montana Mental Health Center, who, in addition to providing case management for involuntary mental health commitment cases, will work with law enforcement to provide outreach and early diversion work with vulnerable populations.

Missoula County and its partners identified these necessary additional resources last April during a Sequential Intercept Mapping workshop, a process that pinpoints gaps in services that would help divert individuals from jail at the different points in which they interact with the criminal justice system.

“Studies show that providing crisis services locally is better for the person in crisis and saves the community money in the long term,” said Josh Slotnick, current commission chair. “Missoula County is committed to using collaborative, innovative and effective strategies to better respond to these crises and provide the best available quality of care.”

Increasing access to resources for individuals experiencing mental health and substance abuse crises is a key component of the Jail Diversion Master Plan, which Missoula County and the City of Missoula adopted in 2016 with the goals of reducing jail overcrowding, decreasing criminal recidivism, enhancing public safety and more effectively using taxpayer money. According to the National Institute on Mental Illness, people in a mental health crisis are more likely to encounter police than get medical help. As a result, 2 million people with mental illnesses across the country are booked into jails each year. Nearly 15% of men and 30% of women booked into jails have a serious mental health condition.

Other jail diversion efforts through Missoula County and its partners include:

  • Involvement in the National Association of Counties’ Stepping Up Initiative, which provides participating agencies with a planning framework and other resources to develop policies, programs and practices to safely reduce the number of people with mental illness or substance abuse disorders who cycle through the criminal justice system.
  • Creation of the Strategic Alliance for Improved Behavioral Health and Wellbeing, a collaboration among local elected officials and high-level stakeholders from the community interested in improving services and responses for individuals with mental illness. This group recently received additional funding from the Montana Healthcare Foundation to continue their work for the next two years to address, at the systems-level, the unmet behavioral health care needs of Missoula’s vulnerable populations, which specifically includes low-income residents, people experiencing homelessness and individuals who have co-occurring substance use disorders.
    Jail 2
  • Development of data-driven solutions to address over-incarceration of vulnerable populations through a $700,000 grant from the MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge. This funding led to the creation of the Criminal Justice Coordination Council, which studies Missoula County’s adult and juvenile criminal justice system to identify challenges, raise public awareness, consolidate efforts, and formulate policy, plans and programs to improve the system. The MacArthur grant also funded the Sequential Intercept Mapping workshop.
  • Donation of a four-acre parcel near the Missoula County Detention Facility to the City of Missoula, which will use the land to develop permanent supportive housing for at least 30 people experiencing chronic homelessness. This facility, which will include a navigation center offering support services, will help reduce this population’s interactions with law enforcement and local emergency departments. Many studies show that when people with mental health disorders are housed, the number of crisis mental health incidents, and subsequent criminal behavior, is reduced.
  • Establishment of ROAD Court, a DUI treatment program in Justice Court aimed at reducing the number of repeat DUIs in Missoula County. The program uses evidence-based practices to help repeat DUI offenders with substance abuse issues become healthy and productive community residents.
  • Creation of Calibrate, a prosecution-led pretrial diversion program in the Missoula County Attorney’s Office. Calibrate is a first-of-its-kind program in Montana that identifies low-risk offenders early and gives them an opportunity to avoid criminal conviction by addressing the underlying causes of criminal behavior, such as addiction. The program will save taxpayer dollars, improve the chances of offenders succeeding and free up resources so prosecutors can focus on violent criminals.

Learn more about Missoula County’s jail diversion efforts online.

Missoula Project Community Connect looking for volunteers

pcc 2

Looking for an opportunity to help our community’s most vulnerable residents? Organizers are seeking about two dozen more volunteers for the 13th annual Project Community Connect, a one-day event this Friday, Feb. 1, that will provide essential services to those experiencing, or who are at risk of, homelessness.

The event, which connects participants to services and items including clothing, toiletries, food, haircuts, and medical and dental care, is slated for 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Zootown Church, 3623 Brooks St. More than 100 community organizations and businesses will come together to provide critical services and hospitality to those experiencing a housing crisis.

Last year, the event served nearly 300 Missoulians, made possible with the help of 134 volunteers who offered up 604 hours of their time. Organizers have no doubt the event will once again fulfill this crucial community need this year.

“We’re grateful for the support we’ve received in the past for Project Community Connect, and we’re confident the Missoula community will step up again this year,” said Sindie Kennedy, grants administrator in Missoula County Community and Planning Services. “By sharing human connections while meeting basic needs and providing core services, we can all help participants move away from their housing crises toward self-sufficiency.”

Project Community Connect (formerly known as Project Homeless Connect) is part of a national movement and historically coincides with the Department of Housing and Urban Development Point in Time Survey, a homeless census that takes place every January. The event is facilitated by members of the Missoula At-Risk Housing Coalition, including Missoula County.

Want to help? Sign up to volunteer online.