New parking regulations in effect for Clark Fork River recreationists

Milltown parking and river access map
Map showing where parking is permitted to access the Clark Fork River near Bonner. 

If you’re planning to float or otherwise recreate on the Clark Fork River near Bonner this summer, county and state officials ask that you follow new parking and river access guidelines aimed at promoting safety and consistency and providing a better user experience.

Missoula County commissioners adopted a resolution in March prohibiting parking along parts of Juniper Drive and Tamarack Road in Bonner (see above map). Located near popular but undesignated, informal river access points, the two roadways had grown increasingly congested in recent years, posing safety and nuisance concerns for nearby residents, emergency vehicles and the public.

Instead, the county is working with Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks to encourage recreationists to park and access the river at the Confluence Area of Milltown State Park. Once you enter the parking lot, signage will direct you toward river access and other amenities. Park admission and parking is free for vehicles registered in Montana and $8 for out-of-state vehicles.

“There have long been safety concerns surrounding river access and parking congestion along Tamarack Road during the busier times of the floating season,” said Chet Crowser, director of Missoula County Community and Planning Services. “The commissioners’ resolution and efforts to redirect river access and parking to Milltown State Park is another great example of collaboration between Missoula County and Fish, Wildlife and Parks to address safety concerns and provide a better recreational experience for the public.”

Missoula County Public Works has installed “no parking” signs along Tamarack Road and Juniper Drive from the junction of Highway 200 to the entrance of the Confluence Area. The Missoula County Sheriff’s Office will enforce the ordinance, which may include towing vehicles in violation. FWP will also post “no parking” signs along the entrance into the Confluence Area, as well as directional signage to help park and river users find the appropriate parking and access points.

Milltown State Park has 80 parking spaces, and a nearby stretch of road at the end of Juniper Drive not affected by the resolution can accommodate overflow and evening parking. There is no parking along interior park roads. While the park is open for day use from sunrise to sunset, the entrance gate is tentatively set to close at 7 p.m. due to COVID-19 concerns. This could change later in the season.

“Providing public access to the restored confluence of the Blackfoot and Clark Fork rivers is one of the founding tenets of Milltown State Park,” said Michael Kustudia, Milltown State Park manager.  “This strategy provides easier and safer access to the public, protects river resources, and addresses traffic and safety concerns of the community. We know this first year will be a learning experience for both our staff and the public, but the end result is a better river experience for everyone.”

In addition to this collaboration, Missoula County and FWP also worked with Three Rivers Collaborative, Downtown Missoula Partnership and Destination Missoula to publish a new map and guide to recreating on the Clark Fork. It’s available online at https://destinationmissoula.org/downtown-river-map.

Solar array purchase moves Missoula County closer to clean energy goals

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Missoula County will move a step closer to achieving its renewable energy goals by purchasing a portion of the clean electricity generated by the Missoula Electric Cooperation’s newest community solar array in Bonner.

By subscribing to 37 of the 189 panels that make up the project, the county will own 20% of the electricity generated by the array for 25 years. The cost to purchase the output of the 37 panels is about $24,000.

Commissioners Dave Strohmaier and Juanita Vero, along with staff and officials from the county and City of Missoula, joined MEC General Manager Mark Hayden on an appropriately sunny day last week for a tour of the Solarshare K3 Garden at the KettleHouse Brewery.

“Missoula County is committed to 100% clean electricity by 2030, and that means maximizing our investments in renewable energy today,” Strohmaier says. “This is a great opportunity to purchase clean, affordable energy, and we encourage county residents who are MEC members to join us and buy into the project if they’re able.”

Hayden says there are about 30 panels left to purchase in the Solarshare K3 Garden. MEC members interested in purchasing a panel can find more details online.

The purchase helps the county make progress on two major goals aimed at combatting climate change: In March, the county adopted a goal of carbon neutrality in county government operations by 2035, and in April, commissioners approved a joint resolution with the City of Missoula, which also subscribes to output from K3 Garden panels, to achieve 100% clean electricity for the Missoula urban area by 2030.

With the K3 Garden purchase, about 63% percent of county operations are now powered by clean energy. Missoula County also owns the output of 10 panels from MEC’s Solarshare 1 project in Lolo and 49 panels from its Solarshare 2 project in Frenchtown.

“Our goals are ambitious but necessary, given the great risks that climate change poses to Missoula County,” says Diana Maneta, the county’s energy conservation and sustainability coordinator. “In addition to participating in Solarshare K3, we’re looking at opportunities to use energy more efficiently, incorporate solar into our buildings and support the development of larger-scale clean energy projects.”

The county, in partnership with Climate Smart Missoula and the city, is also leading the Climate Ready Missoula planning process to prepare for the local impacts of climate change.

Missoula County has also received recognition for its sustainability efforts several times in the past year, including:

  • Silver designation from SolSmart, a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy that recognizes local governments for making it faster, easier and more affordable for property owners to go solar. Missoula County was deemed the first SolSmart county in Montana when it earned a Bronze designation in 2017.
  • A 2019 U.S. Green Building Council Mountain West Leadership Award for the Missoula County Courthouse, which achieved LEED Silver status following a years-long renovation.
  • The Emerging Conservationist Award from the Missoula Conservation Roundtable, which honored Maneta for her role in establishing goals and regulations related to renewable energy and sustainability.

To learn even more about Missoula County’s sustainability and conservation efforts, head to http://missoula.co/sustainability. There, you’ll find information on going solar, recycling and composting, building climate resiliency and more.